An analysis of shakespeares love tragedy romeo and juliet

Shakespeare is sympathetic toward Romeo and Juliet, and in attributing their tragedy to fate, rather than to a flaw in their characters, he raises them to heights near perfection, as well as running the risk of creating pathos, not tragedy.

An analysis of shakespeares love tragedy romeo and juliet

Romeo and Juliet Apart from the early Titus Andronicus, the only other play that Shakespeare wrote prior to that is classified as a tragedy is Romeo and Juliet c. Romeo and Juliet are not persons of extraordinary social rank or position, like HamletOthelloKing Learand Macbeth.

They are the boy and girl next door, interesting not for their philosophical ideas but for their appealing love for each other.

They are character types more suited to Classical comedy in that they do not derive from the upper class. Their wealthy families are essentially bourgeois. The eagerness with which Capulet and his wife court Count Paris as their prospective son-in-law bespeaks their desire for social advancement.

An analysis of shakespeares love tragedy romeo and juliet

The bawdry of Mercutio and of the Nurse is richly suited to the comic texture of the opening scenes. The plucky and self-knowing Juliet is much like the heroines of romantic comedies.

She is able to instruct Romeo in the ways of speaking candidly and unaffectedly about their love rather than in the frayed cadences of the Petrarchan wooer. Romeo and Juliet are unremarkable, nice young people doomed by a host of considerations outside themselves: Yet there is the element of personal responsibility upon which most mature tragedy rests when Romeo chooses to avenge the death of Mercutio by killing Tybalt, knowing that this deed will undo the soft graces of forbearance that Juliet has taught him.

Romeo succumbs to the macho peer pressure of his male companions, and tragedy results in part from this choice. Yet so much is at work that the reader ultimately sees Romeo and Juliet as a love tragedy—celebrating the exquisite brevity of young love, regretting an unfeeling world, and evoking an emotional response that differs from that produced by the other tragedies.

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The emotional response the play evokes is a strong one, but it is not like the response called forth by the tragedies after Perhaps he saw that his own life was moving into a new phase of more complex and vexing experiences.

Perhaps he felt, or sensed, that he had worked through the romantic comedy and history play and the emotional trajectories of maturation that they encompassed. At any event, he began writing not only his great tragedies but a group of plays that are hard to classify in terms of genre.

An examination of these plays is crucial to understanding this period of transition from to Count Bertram cannot initially accept his marriage to Helena, a woman of lower social station who has grown up in his noble household and has won Bertram as her husband by her seemingly miraculous cure of the French king.

Her ends are achieved by such morally ambiguous means that marriage seems at best a precarious institution on which to base the presumed reassurances of romantic comedy. The pathway toward resolution and emotional maturity is not easy; Helena is a more ambiguous heroine than Rosalind or Viola.

Measure for Measure c. Isabella, on the verge of becoming a nun, learns that she has attracted the sexual desire of Lord Angelo, the deputy ruler of Vienna serving in the mysterious absence of the Duke. This ethical dilemma is resolved by a trick devised by the Duke, in disguise to substitute for Isabella a woman Mariana whom Angelo was supposed to marry but refused when she could produce no dowry.

Angelo is revealed as a morally fallen man, a would-be seducer and murderer who is nonetheless remorseful and ultimately glad to have been prevented from carrying out his intended crimes; Claudio learns that he is coward enough to wish to live by any means, including the emotional and physical blackmail of his sister; and Isabella learns that she is capable of bitterness and hatred, even if, crucially, she finally discovers that she can and must forgive her enemy.

Troilus and Cressida c.

An analysis of shakespeares love tragedy romeo and juliet

Simply in terms of genreit is virtually unclassifiable. It can hardly be a comedy, ending as it does in the deaths of Patroclus and Hector and the looming defeat of the Trojans.Altri progetti Wikisource Wikisource Wikiquote Wikiquote Wikibooks Wikibooks Wikimedia Commons Wikisource contiene una pagina dedicata a William Shakespeare.

Get an answer for 'What is the point/benefit of studying Romeo and Juliet when the language is so difficult and it's a dumb love story where everyone dies at the end?' and find homework help for.

Character Analysis of Romeo in William Shakespeare´s Romeo and Juliet Words 6 Pages Romeo, at the beginning of the play, is a love-struck, immature, and impulsive young man.

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The most widely regarded view is that Shakespeare used the model of tragedy set up by Aristotle. There are some problems with this, however. Analysis of Romeo and Juliet's Exchange in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare explains 3 types of love, Courtly, arranged and spontaneous and even more.

Love is one of the powerful emotions known by the human being. The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, a tragic play by William Shakespeare, is the story of two star-crossed lovers who are plagued by the hatred and detestation of their respective families. Romeo Montague, a young boy, falls in love with Juliet Capulet, a fourteen year old girl.

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